Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 3.480
IF3.480
IF 5-year value: 4.194
IF 5-year
4.194
CiteScore value: 6.7
CiteScore
6.7
SNIP value: 1.143
SNIP1.143
IPP value: 3.65
IPP3.65
SJR value: 1.761
SJR1.761
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 118
Scimago H
index
118
h5-index value: 60
h5-index60
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-510
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-510
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  04 Feb 2020

04 Feb 2020

Review status
A revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Understanding the effect of fire on vegetation composition and gross primary production in a semi-arid shrubland ecosystem using the Ecosystem Demography (EDv2.2) model

Karun Pandit1, Hamid Dashti2, Andrew T. Hudak3, Nancy F. Glenn1, Alejandro N. Flores1, and Douglas J. Shinneman4 Karun Pandit et al.
  • 1Department of Geosciences, Boise State University, 1910 University Dr, Boise, ID 83725-1535, USA
  • 2School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Arizona
  • 3US Forest Service, Forest Sciences Laboratory, 1221 South Main Street Moscow, ID, 83843, USA
  • 4United States Geological Survey, Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, 970 Lusk St., Boise, ID 83706, USA

Abstract. Wildfire incidents in sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) dominated semi-arid ecosystems in the western United States have risen dramatically in the last few decades. Severe wildfires often lead to the loss of native sagebrush communities and change the biogeochemical conditions which make it difficult for sagebrush to regenerate. Invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) accentuates the problem by making the ecosystem more susceptible to frequent burns. Managers have implemented several techniques to cope with the cheatgrass-fire cycle, ranging from controlling undesirable fire effects by removing fuel loads either mechanically or via prescribed burns, to seeding the fire-affected areas with shrubs and native perennial forbs. There have been a number of studies at local scales to understand the direct impacts of wildfire on vegetation, however there is a larger gap in understanding these impacts at broad spatial and temporal scales. This need highlights the importance of global dynamic vegetation models (DGVMs) and remote sensing. In this study, we explored the influence of fire on vegetation composition and gross primary production (GPP) in the sagebrush ecosystem using the Ecosystem Demography (EDv2.2) model, a dynamic vegetation model. We selected Reynold Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) to run our simulation study, which represents sagebrush dominated ecosystems in the northern Great Basin. We ran point-based simulations at four existing flux-tower sites in the study area for a total 150 years after turning on the fire module in the 25th year. Results suggest dominance of shrub in a non-fire scenario, however under the fire scenario we observed contrasting phases of high and low shrub and C3 grass growth. Regional model simulations showed a gradual decline in gross primary production (GPP) for fire-introduced areas through the initial couple of years instead of killing all the vegetation in the affected area in the first year itself. We also compared the results from EDv2.2 with satellite data for the areas in RCEW affected by the 2015 Soda Fire. We observed a good spatial agreement between modeled GPP and a Landsat image-derived index for the study area with moderate to marginally strong correlations at the pixel level between maps of post-fire recovery GPP and the vegetation response observed in a post-fire Landsat image. This study contributes in understanding the application of ecosystem models to investigate temporal dynamics of vegetation under alternative fire regimes and the spatial behavior of post-fire ecosystem restoration.

Karun Pandit et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment

Karun Pandit et al.

Data sets

Meteorological and ecosystem data K. Pandit https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3592261

Karun Pandit et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 237 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
166 63 8 237 24 4 6
  • HTML: 166
  • PDF: 63
  • XML: 8
  • Total: 237
  • Supplement: 24
  • BibTeX: 4
  • EndNote: 6
Views and downloads (calculated since 04 Feb 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 04 Feb 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 209 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 209 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 27 Sep 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Our study explores the application of a dynamic global vegetation model, Ecosystem Demography (EDv2.2) to understand temporal dynamics of ecosystem under alternate fire regimes and the spatial behavior of post-fire restoration. Point-based simulations suggested dominance of shrub in a non-fire scenario and contrasting phases of shrub and C3 grass growth for a fire scenario. Regional simulations showed a decline in GPP for fire affected areas for initial couple of years before showing recovery.
Our study explores the application of a dynamic global vegetation model, Ecosystem Demography...
Citation
Altmetrics