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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-260
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-260
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  06 Aug 2020

06 Aug 2020

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A revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal BG.

Combined effects of ozone and drought stress on the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds from Quercus robur L.

Arianna Peron1, Lisa Kaser1, Anne Charlott Fitzky2, Martin Graus1, Heidi Halbwirth3, Jürgen Greiner3, Georg Wohlfahrt4, Boris Rewald2, Hans Sandén2, and Thomas Karl1 Arianna Peron et al.
  • 1Institute of Atmospheric and Cryospheric Sciences, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, 6020, Austria
  • 2Forest Ecology, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna (BOKU), Vienna, 1190, Austria
  • 3Technische Universität Wien, Institut für Verfahrenstechnik, Umwelttechnik und Technische Biowissenschaften, A-1060, Vienna, Austria
  • 4Department of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, 6020, Austria

Abstract. Drought events are expected to become more frequent with climate change. To predict the effect of plant emissions on air-quality and potential feedback effects on climate, the study of biogenic volatile organic compound emissions under stress is of great importance. Trees can often be subject to a combination of abiotic stresses, for example due to drought or ozone. Even though there is a large body of knowledge on individual stress factors, the effects of combined stressors are not much explored. This study aimed to investigate changes of biogenic volatile organic compound emissions and physiological parameters in Quercus robur L. during moderate to severe drought in combination with ozone stress. Results show that isoprene emissions decreased while monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions increased during the progression of drought. Exposing plants additionally to ozone, resulted in faster stomatal closure partially mitigating drought stress effects. Evidence of this was found in enhanced green leaf volatiles in trees without ozone fumigation indicating cellular damage. In addition we observed an enhancement in Methyl Salicylate emissions in trees with ozone treatment. Individual plant stress factors are not necessarily additive and atmospheric models should implement stress feedback loops to study regional scale effects.

Arianna Peron et al.

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Arianna Peron et al.

Arianna Peron et al.

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Latest update: 23 Nov 2020
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Short summary
Drought events are expected to become more frequent with climate change. Along with these events atmospheric ozone is also expected to increase. Both can stress plants. Here we investigate to what extent these factors modulate the emission of volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from oak plants. We find an antagonistic effect between drought stress and ozone, impacting the emission of different BVOCs, that is indirectly controlled by stomatal opening, allowing plants to control their water budget.
Drought events are expected to become more frequent with climate change. Along with these events...
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