Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 3.480
IF3.480
IF 5-year value: 4.194
IF 5-year
4.194
CiteScore value: 6.7
CiteScore
6.7
SNIP value: 1.143
SNIP1.143
IPP value: 3.65
IPP3.65
SJR value: 1.761
SJR1.761
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 118
Scimago H
index
118
h5-index value: 60
h5-index60
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-299
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-299
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  20 Aug 2020

20 Aug 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Examining the sensitivity of the terrestrial carbon cycle to the expression of El Niño

Lina Teckentrup1,2, Martin G. De Kauwe1,2,3, Andrew J. Pitman1,2, and Benjamin Smith4,5 Lina Teckentrup et al.
  • 1ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  • 2Climate Change Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
  • 3Evolution & Ecology Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
  • 4Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW, Australia
  • 5Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund University, Lund, Sweden

Abstract. The El Niño‐Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influences the global climate and the variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle on interannual timescales. Two different expressions of El Niño have recently been identified: (i) Central–Pacific (CP) and (ii) Eastern–Pacific (EP). Both types of El Nino are characterised by above average sea surface temperature anomalies in the respective locations. Studies exploring the impact of these expressions of El Niño on the carbon cycle have identified changes in the amplitude of the concentration of interannual atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) variability, as well as different lags in terrestrial CO2 release to the atmosphere following increased tropical near surface air temperature. We employ the dynamic global vegetation model LPJ–GUESS within a synthetic experimental framework to examine the sensitivity and potential long term impacts of these two expressions of El Niño on the terrestrial carbon cycle. We manipulated the occurrence of CP and EP events in two climate reanalysis datasets during the later half of the 20th and early 21st century by replacing all EP with CP and separately all CP with EP El Niño events. We found that the different expressions of El Niño affect interannual variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle. However, the effect on longer timescales was negligible for both climate reanalysis datasets. We conclude that capturing any future trends in the relative frequency of CP and EP El Niño events may not be critical for robust simulations of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

Lina Teckentrup et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment

Lina Teckentrup et al.

Lina Teckentrup et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 242 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
177 62 3 242 7 5
  • HTML: 177
  • PDF: 62
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 242
  • BibTeX: 7
  • EndNote: 5
Views and downloads (calculated since 20 Aug 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 20 Aug 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 176 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 174 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 23 Nov 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The El Niño‐Southern Oscillation (ENSO) describes changes in the sea surface temperature patterns of the Pacific Ocean. This influences the global weather, impacting vegetation on land. There are two types of El Niño: Central–Pacific (CP) and Eastern–Pacific (EP). In this study, we explored the long-term impacts on the carbon balance on land linked to the two El Niño types. Using a dynamic vegetation model, we simulated what would happen if only either CP or EP El Niño events had occurred.
The El Niño‐Southern Oscillation (ENSO) describes changes in the sea surface temperature...
Citation
Altmetrics