Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 3.480
IF3.480
IF 5-year value: 4.194
IF 5-year
4.194
CiteScore value: 6.7
CiteScore
6.7
SNIP value: 1.143
SNIP1.143
IPP value: 3.65
IPP3.65
SJR value: 1.761
SJR1.761
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 118
Scimago H
index
118
h5-index value: 60
h5-index60
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-367
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-367
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  04 Nov 2020

04 Nov 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Evaluating the potential for Archaea to serve as ice nucleating particles

Jessie M. Creamean1, Julio E. Ceniceros3, Lilyanna Newman2, Allyson D. Pace2, Thomas C. J. Hill1, Paul J. DeMott1, and Matthew E. Rhodes2 Jessie M. Creamean et al.
  • 1Dept. of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
  • 2Dept. of Biology, College of Charleston, SC, USA
  • 3Geological Sciences, University of Texas, El Paso, TX, USA

Abstract. Aerosols play a crucial role in cloud formation. Biologically-derived materials from microorganisms such as plant bacteria, fungi, pollen, and various vegetative detritus can serve as ice nucleating particles (INPs), some of which initiate glaciation in clouds at relatively warm freezing temperatures. However, determining the magnitude of the interactions between clouds and biologically-derived INPs remains a significant challenge due to the diversity and complexity of bioaerosols, and limited observations of such aerosols to facilitate cloud ice formation. Additionally, microorganisms from the domain Archaea have to date not been evaluated as INPs. Here, we present the first results reporting the ice nucleation activity of a subset of archaeal cells from Haloarchaea. Intact cells of Halococcus morrhuae and Haloferax sulfurifontis demonstrated the ability to induce freezing as warm as −18 ˚C, while lysed cells of Haloquadratum walsbyi and Natronomonas pharaonis were unable to serve as warm temperature INPs. Exposure to heat and peroxide digestion indicated that the INPs of intact cells were driven by organic (H. morrhuae and H. sulfurifontis) and possibly also heat-labile materials (H. sulfurifontis only). While halophiles are prominent in hypersaline environments such as the Great Salt Lake and the Dead Sea, other members of the Archaea, such as methanogens and thermophiles, are prevalent in anoxic systems in seawater, sea ice, marine sediments, glacial ice, permafrost, and other cold niches. Archaeal extremophiles are both diverse and highly abundant. Thus, assessing their ability to become airborne, and their abilities to impact cloud formation, is necessary to improve understanding of biological impacts on clouds.

Jessie M. Creamean et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 17 Dec 2020)
Status: open (until 17 Dec 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Jessie M. Creamean et al.

Jessie M. Creamean et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 192 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
156 35 1 192 1 1
  • HTML: 156
  • PDF: 35
  • XML: 1
  • Total: 192
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 04 Nov 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 04 Nov 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 154 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 151 with geography defined and 3 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 25 Nov 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Microorganisms have the unique ability to form ice in clouds at relatively warm temperatures, especially specific types of plant bacteria. However, to date, members of the domain Archaea have not been evaluated for their cloud forming capabilities. Here, we show the first results of archaea that have the ability to form cloud ice at moderate supercooled temperatures that are found in hypersaline environments on Earth.
Microorganisms have the unique ability to form ice in clouds at relatively warm temperatures,...
Citation
Altmetrics