Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-452
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-452

  08 Jan 2021

08 Jan 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal BG and is expected to appear here in due course.

Dead sands: bioerosion of alien foraminiferal shells in a Mediterranean seagrass meadow

Martin Vohník Martin Vohník
  • Department of Mycorrhizal Symbioses, Institute of Botany, Czech Academy of Sciences, Průhonice, 25243, Czechia

Abstract. Foraminiferans are diverse macroscopic protists abundant in (sub-)tropical seas, often forming characteristic benthic communities known as living sands. Numerous species have migrated through the Suez Canal to the Mediterranean, some turning invasive and gradually outcompeting the indigenous species. The most expansive Amphistegina lobifera often creates thick seabed sediments, thus becoming an important environmental engineer. However, little is known about the turnover of its shells in the invaded ecosystems. Using vital staining, stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, cultivation and DNA fingerprinting, I investigated the vital status, destruction/decomposition and mycobiota of A. lobifera in the rhizosphere of the dominant Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica in an underwater Maltese meadow (average 284 shells/g, representing 28.5 % of dry substrate weight), in comparison with epiphytic specimens and P. oceanica roots. While 78 % of the epiphytes were alive, nearly all substrate specimens were dead. On average, 80 % of the epiphytes were intact, compared to 21% of the substrate specimens. Abiotic dissolution and mechanical damage played only a minor role, but some bioerosion was detected in 18 % and > 70 % of the epiphytic and substrate specimens, respectively. Few bioerosion traces could be attributed to fungi and the majority probably belonged to photoautotrophs. The seagrass roots displayed fungal colonization typical for this species and yielded 81 identified isolates, while the surface-sterilized substrate specimens surprisingly yielded no cultivable fungi, compared to other 16 identified isolates obtained from the epiphytes. While the epiphytes' mycobiota was dominated by ascomycetous generalists also known from terrestrial ecosystems (alongside with, e.g., a relative of the rock-eating extremophiles), the roots were dominated by the seagrass-specific dark septate endophyte Posidoniomyces atricolor and additionally contained a previously unreported lulworthioid mycobiont. In conclusion, dead A. lobifera shells seem to be regularly bioeroded by endolithic non-fungal organisms, which may counterbalance their accumulation in the seabed substrate.

Martin Vohník

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2020-452', Martin R. Langer, 26 Jan 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Martin Vohník, 29 Jan 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2020-452', Antonino Briguglio, 27 Jan 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Martin Vohník, 30 Jan 2021

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2020-452', Martin R. Langer, 26 Jan 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Martin Vohník, 29 Jan 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2020-452', Antonino Briguglio, 27 Jan 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Martin Vohník, 30 Jan 2021

Martin Vohník

Martin Vohník

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Short summary
Amphistegina lobifera (Foraminifera) has colonized the Mediterranean through the Suez Canal, often forming thick sediments altering the invaded environments. Little is known about post mortem fate of its shells, so I investigated their turnover in the rhizosphere of the dominant Mediterranean seagrass. Most of them were bioeroded, likely by cyanobacteria and algae, not fungi occurring in the seagrass roots. Bioerosion may counterbalance accumulation of A. lobifera shells in the seabed substrate.
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