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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Climate change can change vegetation characteristics in grasslands with a potential impact on forage quality, use by ruminants, and in turn greenhouse gas emissions such as enteric methane. Using controlled conditions mimicking a future climatic scenario, we show that forage quality and ruminant digestion are affected in opposite ways by elevated atmospheric CO2 and an extreme event (heat wave, severe drought), indicating that different factors of climate change have to be considered together.
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https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-464
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-464

  11 Jan 2021

11 Jan 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Effects of elevated CO2 and extreme climatic events on forage quality and in vitro rumen fermentation in permanent grassland

Vincent Niderkorn1, Annette Morvan-Bertrand2, Aline Le Morvan1, Marie-Lise Benot3,4, Angela Augusti5, Marie-Laure Decau6, and Catherine Picon-Cochard3 Vincent Niderkorn et al.
  • 1Université Clermont Auvergne, INRAE, VetAgro Sup, UMRH, 63122, Saint-Genès-Champanelle, France
  • 2Ecophysiologie Végétale Agronomie et nutritions N.C.S. Normandie Univ, UNICAEN, INRAE, EVA, 14000 Caen, France
  • 3Université Clermont Auvergne, INRAE, VetAgro Sup, UREP, 63000 Clermont-Ferrand, France
  • 4Univ. Bordeaux, INRAE, BIOGECO, F-33600, Pessac, France
  • 5CNR-Research Institute on Terrestrial Ecosystems, 05010 Porano (TR), Italy
  • 6INRAE, Unité Expérimentale Ferlus, Lusignan

Abstract. This study was aimed at analyzing changes in botanical and chemical composition, and in vitro rumen fermentation characteristics of an upland grassland exposed to climate changes in controlled conditions except for light intensity, which was the natural one. Grassland was exposed to future climate scenario coupled with CO2 treatments (390 and 520 ppm) from the beginning of spring. During summer, an extreme event (two weeks of increased temperature, +6 °C, associated with severe drought, ECE) was associated. After the ECE, a recovery treatment was performed. Three cutting dates in April, June and November were considered. Our results indicate that increases in greenness, nitrogen (N) content and changes in water-soluble carbohydrate profile for the cut of November result in higher in vitro dry matter degradability (IVDMD) in the rumen. The neutral detergent fiber : nitrogen (NDF : N) ratio appeared to be a main driver of forage quality affected in opposite ways by elevated CO2 and ECE, with a strong impact on rumen fermentation. A trend towards an interaction between atmospheric CO2 concentration and ECE was observed in IVDMD, indicating that their effects could partly offset each other. These findings indicate that the different factors of climate change have to be considered together to characterize their effects on forage quality and use by ruminants.

Vincent Niderkorn et al.

Status: open (until 22 Feb 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Vincent Niderkorn et al.

Vincent Niderkorn et al.

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Short summary
Climate change can change vegetation characteristics in grasslands with a potential impact on forage quality, use by ruminants, and in turn greenhouse gas emissions such as enteric methane. Using controlled conditions mimicking a future climatic scenario, we show that forage quality and ruminant digestion are affected in opposite ways by elevated atmospheric CO2 and an extreme event (heat wave, severe drought), indicating that different factors of climate change have to be considered together.
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