Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-327
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-327
 
23 Dec 2021
23 Dec 2021
Status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Implementation and initial calibration of carbon-13 soil organic matter decomposition in Yasso model

Jarmo Mäkelä1, Laura Arppe2, Hannu Fritze3, Jussi Heinonsalo4, Jari Liski1, Markku Oinonen2, Petra Straková5, and Toni Viskari1 Jarmo Mäkelä et al.
  • 1Finnish Meteorological Institute, P.O. Box 503, FI-00101 Helsinki, Finland
  • 2Finnish Museum of Natural History LUOMUS, P.O. Box 64, 00014, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
  • 3Natural Resources Institute Finland, P.O. Box 18, FI-01301, Vantaa, Finland
  • 4Department of Microbiology and Institute for atmospheric research INAR, Faculty of Agriculture and Forestry, P.O. Box 56, 00014 University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
  • 5Natural Resources Institute Finland, P.O. Box 2, 00791, Helsinki, Finland

Abstract. Soil carbon sequestration has gained traction as a mean to mitigate rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Verification of different methods’ efficiency to increase soil carbon sink requires, in addition to good quality measurements, reliable models capable of simulating the effect of the sequestration practices. One way to get insight of the methods’ effects on carbon cycling processes is to analyse different carbon isotope concentrations in soil organic matter. In this paper we introduce a carbon-13 isotope specific soil organic matter decomposition add-on into the Yasso soil carbon model and assess its functionality. The new 13C-dedicated decomposition is straightforward to implement and depends linearly on the default Yasso model parameters and the relative carbon isotope (13C/12C) concentration. Despite of their simplicity, the modifications considerably improve the model behaviour in a 50-year long simulation.

Jarmo Mäkelä et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-327', Anonymous Referee #1, 16 Feb 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Jarmo Mäkelä, 30 Mar 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-327', Anonymous Referee #2, 09 Mar 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Jarmo Mäkelä, 30 Mar 2022
  • EC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-327', Ben Bond-Lamberty, 09 Apr 2022
    • EC2: 'Reply on EC1', Ben Bond-Lamberty, 09 Apr 2022

Jarmo Mäkelä et al.

Jarmo Mäkelä et al.

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Short summary
Soil carbon sequestration has gained traction as a mean to mitigate rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Verification of different methods’ efficiency requires good quality measurements and reliable models. We present a straightforward way to include carbon isotope concentrations into soil decomposition and carbon storages. The modifications considerable improve the model behaviour and enables the use of carbon isotopes as trackers for e.g. soil management practices.
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