Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-335
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-335

  05 Jan 2022

05 Jan 2022

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Main drivers of plant diversity patterns of rubber plantations in the Greater Mekong Sub-region

Guoyu Lan1,2,, Banqian Chen1,2,, Chuan Yang1,2, Rui Sun1,2, Zhixiang Wu1,2, and Xicai Zhang1,2 Guoyu Lan et al.
  • 1Rubber Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Danzhou City, Hainan Province, 571737, P. R. China
  • 2Danzhou Investigation & Experiment Station of Tropical Crops, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Danzhou City, Hainan Province, 571737, P. R. China
  • These authors contributed equally to this work.

Abstract. The Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS) is one the global biodiversity hotspots. However, the diversity has been seriously threatened due to environmental degradation and deforestation, especially by expansion of rubber plantations. Yet, little is known about the impact of rubber plantations on plant diversity. In this study, we analyzed plant diversity patterns of rubber plantations in the GMS based on a ground survey of a large number of samples. We found that diversity varied across countries due to varying agricultural intensities. Laos had the highest diversity, then followed China, Myanmar, Cambodia. Thailand and Vietnam were the lowest among them. Plant species richness of Laos was about 1.5 times that of Vietnam. We uncovered latitudinal and longitudinal gradients in plant diversity across these artificial forests of rubber plantations. These gradients could be explained by the traditional ecological theories. Furthermore, null deviation of observed community to the randomly assembled communities were larger than zero indicating deterministic process were more important for structuring the community. Meanwhile, the results also showed that higher dominance of some exotic species (such as Chromolaena odorata and Mimosa pudica) were associated with a loss of plant diversity within rubber plantations. In conclusion, not only environmental factors (such as elevation and latitude), but also exotic species were the main factors affecting diversity of these artificial stands. Much more effort should be made to balance agricultural production with conservation goals in this region, particularly to minimize the diversity loss in Vietnam and Cambodia.

Guoyu Lan et al.

Status: open (until 16 Feb 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Guoyu Lan et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 215 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
191 20 4 215 15 1 2
  • HTML: 191
  • PDF: 20
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 215
  • Supplement: 15
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Jan 2022)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Jan 2022)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 183 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 183 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 24 Jan 2022
Download
Short summary
Little is known about the impact of rubber plantations on diversity of the Great Mekong Sub-region. In this study, we uncovered latitudinal and longitudinal gradients of plant diversity of rubber plantations. Exotic species with high dominance results in loss of plant diversity of rubber plantations. Not all exotic species would reduce plant diversity of rubber plantations. Much more effort should be made to balance agricultural production with conservation goals in this region.
Altmetrics