Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-34
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-34

  22 Feb 2021

22 Feb 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Anthropogenic CO2-mediated freshwater acidification limits survival, calcification, metabolism, and behaviour in stress-tolerant freshwater crustaceans

Alex R. Quijada-Rodriguez1, Pou-Long Kuan2, Po-Hsuan Sung2, Mao-Ting Hsu2, Garett J. P. Allen1, Pung Pung Hwang3, Yung-Che Tseng2,, and Dirk Weihrauch1, Alex R. Quijada-Rodriguez et al.
  • 1Biological Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2N2, Canada
  • 2Marine Research Station, Institute of Cellular and Organismal Biology, Academia Sinica, No. 23-10 Dawen Rd., Jiaoxi, Yilan County, Taiwan, 262
  • 3Institute of Cellular and Organismal Biology, Academia Sinica, No. 128, Section 2, Academia Rd., Nangang District, Taipei City, Taiwan, 11529
  • Indicates that these authors have contributed equally to this work

Abstract. Dissolution of anthropogenic CO2 is chronically acidifying aquatic ecosystems. Studies indicate that ocean acidification will cause marine life, especially calcifying species, to suffer at the organismal and ecosystem levels. In comparison, freshwater acidification has received less attention rendering its consequences unclear. Here, juvenile Chinese mitten crabs, Eriocheir sinensis, were used as a calcifying model to investigate the impacts of CO2-mediated freshwater acidification. Our integrative approach investigating changes in the animal's acid-base homeostasis, metabolism, calcification, locomotory behaviour, and survival rate indicate that the crab will face energetic consequences from future freshwater acidification. These energetic trade-offs allow the animal to maintain its acid-base homeostasis at the cost of reduced metabolic activity, exoskeletal calcification, and locomotion reducing the animal's overall fitness and increasing its mortality. Results suggest that present-day calcifying invertebrates could be heavily affected by freshwater acidification similar to their marine organisms and emphasizes the importance in understanding the long-term implications of freshwater acidification on species fitness.

Alex R. Quijada-Rodriguez et al.

Status: open (until 05 Apr 2021)

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Alex R. Quijada-Rodriguez et al.

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Anthropogenic CO2-mediated freshwater acidification limits survival, calcification, metabolism, and behaviour in stress-tolerant freshwater crustaceans Alex R. Quijada-Rodriguez, Pou-Long Kuan, Po-Hsuan Sung, Mao-Ting Hsu, Garett J. P. Allen, Pung Pung Hwang, Yung-Che Tseng, and Dirk Weihrauch http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.13888034

Alex R. Quijada-Rodriguez et al.

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Short summary
Anthropogenic CO2 is chronically acidifying aquatic ecosystems. We aimed to determine the impact of future freshwater acidification on the physiology and behaviour of an important aquaculture crustacean, Chinese mitten crab. We report that elevated freshwater CO2 levels lead to impairment of calcification, locomotory behaviour, survival and reduced metabolism in this species. Results suggest that present-day calcifying invertebrates could be heavily affected by freshwater acidification.
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