Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-39
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-39

  22 Feb 2021

22 Feb 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal BG.

Sediment and carbon accumulation in a glacial lake in Chukotka (Arctic Siberia) during the late Pleistocene and Holocene: Combining hydroacoustic profiling and down-core analyses

Stuart A. Vyse1,2, Ulrike Herzschuh1,2,4, Gregor Pfalz1,2, Lyudmila A. Pestryakova5, Bernhard Diekmann1,2,3, Norbert Nowaczyk6, and Boris K. Biskaborn1 Stuart A. Vyse et al.
  • 1Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Research Unit Potsdam, Telegrafenberg A45, 14471 Potsdam, Germany
  • 2Institute of Environmental Science and Geography, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany
  • 3Institute of Geosciences, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany
  • 4Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany
  • 5Northeastern Federal University of Yakutsk, Yakutsk, Russia
  • 6Helmholtz-Centre Potsdam GFZ, Climate Dynamics and Landscape Evolution, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam, Germany

Abstract. Lakes act as important sinks for inorganic and organic sediment components. However, investigations of sedimentary carbon budgets within glacial lakes are currently absent from Arctic Siberia. The aim of this paper is to provide the first reconstruction of accumulation rates, sediment and carbon budgets from a lacustrine sediment core from Lake Rauchuagytgyn, Chukotka (Arctic Siberia). We combined multiple sediment-biogeochemical and sedimentological parameters from a radiocarbon-dated 6.5 m sediment core with lake basin hydroacoustic data to derive sediment stratigraphy, sediment volumes, and infill budgets. Our results distinguished three principal sediment and carbon accumulation regimes that could be identified across all measured environmental proxies including Early MIS2 (ca. 29–23.4 cal. ka BP), Mid-to-late MIS2 (ca. 23.4–11.5 cal. ka BP), and Holocene (ca. 11.5–present). Estimated organic carbon accumulation rates (OCARs) were higher within Holocene sediments (average 3.53 g OC m−2 a−1) than Pleistocene sediments (average 1.09 g OC m−2 a−1) and are similar to those calculated for boreal lakes from Quebec and Finland and Lake Baikal but significantly lower than Siberian thermokarst lakes and Alberta glacial lakes. Using a bootstrapping approach, we estimated the total organic carbon pool to 0.26 ± 0.02 Mt and a total sediment pool of 25.7 ± 1.71 Mt within a hydroacoustically derived sediment volume of ca. 32990557 m3. The total organic carbon pool is substantially smaller than Alaskan Yedoma, thermokarst lake sediments, and Alberta glacial lakes but shares similarities with Finnish boreal lakes. Temporal variability in sediment and carbon accumulation dynamics at Lake Rauchuagytgyn is controlled predominantly by palaeoclimate variation that regulates lake ice-cover dynamics and catchment glacial, fluvial and permafrost processes through time. These processes, in turn, affect catchment and within-lake primary productivity as well as catchment soil development. Spatial differences to other lake systems at a trans-regional scale likely relates to the high-latitude, mountainous location of Lake Rauchuagytgyn.

Stuart A. Vyse et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-39', Anonymous Referee #1, 26 Mar 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-39', Daniel Nyvlt, 13 Apr 2021

Stuart A. Vyse et al.

Stuart A. Vyse et al.

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Short summary
Lakes act as important stores of organic carbon and inorganic sediment material. This study provides a first investigation into carbon and sediment accumulation and storage within an Arctic glacial lake from Far East Russia. It shows that major shifts are related to palaeoclimate variation that affects the development of the lake and its surrounding catchment. Spatial differences to other lake systems from other regions may reflect variability in processes controlled by latitude and altitude.
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