Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-192
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-192

  26 Jul 2021

26 Jul 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint was accepted for the journal BG and is expected to appear here in due course.

Evaluation of carbonyl sulfide biosphere exchange in the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB4)

Linda M. J. Kooijmans1, Ara Cho1, Jin Ma2, Aleya Kaushik3,4, Katherine D. Haynes5, Ian Baker5, Ingrid T. Luijkx1, Mathijs Groenink1, Wouter Peters1,6, John B. Miller4, Joseph A. Berry7, Jérôme Ogée8, Laura K. Meredith9, Wu Sun7, Kukka-Maaria Kohonen10, Timo Vesala10,11,12, Ivan Mammarella10, Huilin Chen6, Felix M. Spielmann13, Georg Wohlfahrt13, Max Berkelhammer14, Mary E. Whelan15, Kadmiel Maseyk16, Ulli Seibt17, Roisin Commane18, Richard Wehr19,a, and Maarten Krol1,2 Linda M. J. Kooijmans et al.
  • 1Meteorology and Air Quality, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands
  • 2Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
  • 3Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder, CO, USA
  • 4NOAA Global Monitoring Laboratory, Boulder, CO, USA
  • 5Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, USA
  • 6Centre for Isotope Research, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
  • 7Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA, USA
  • 8INRAE, Bordeaux Science Agro, UMR 1391 ISPA, 33140 Villenave d’Ornon, France
  • 9School of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
  • 10Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
  • 11Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research/Forest Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
  • 12Yugra State University, 628012, Khanty-Mansiysk, Russia
  • 13Department of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Austria
  • 14Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
  • 15Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA
  • 16School of Environment, Earth and Ecosystem Sciences, The Open University, MK 7 6AA Milton Keynes, United Kingdom
  • 17Department of Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences, UCLA, USA
  • 18Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY 10964, USA
  • 19Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, USA
  • acurrently at: Center for Atmospheric and Environmental Chemistry, Aerodyne Research, Inc., USA

Abstract. The uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS) by terrestrial plants is linked to photosynthetic uptake of CO2 by a shared diffusion pathway. Applying COS as a photosynthesis tracer in models requires an accurate representation of biosphere COS fluxes, but these models have not been extensively evaluated against field observations of COS fluxes. In this paper, the COS flux as simulated by the Simple Biosphere Model, version 4 (SiB4) is updated with the latest mechanistic insights and evaluated with site observations from different biomes: one evergreen needleleaf forest, two deciduous broadleaf forests, three grasslands, and two crop fields spread over Europe and North America. To account for the effect of atmospheric COS mole fractions on COS biosphere uptake, we replaced the fixed COS mole fraction originally used in SiB4 with spatially and temporally varying COS mole fraction fields. The lower COS mole fractions in the late growing season reduces COS uptake rates in agreement with observations. We also replaced the empirical soil COS uptake model in SiB4 with a mechanistic model that represents both uptake and production of COS in soils, which improves the match with observations over agricultural fields and fertilized grassland soils. SiB4 was capable of simulating the diurnal and seasonal variation of COS fluxes in the boreal, temperate and Mediterranean region. The daytime vegetation COS flux is on average 8 ± 27 % underestimated, albeit with large variability across sites. On a global scale, our model modifications caused a drop in the COS biosphere sink from 922 Gg S yr−1 in the original SiB4 model to 753 Gg S yr−1 in the updated version. The largest drop in fluxes was driven by lower atmospheric COS mole fractions over regions with high productivity, which highlights the importance of accounting for variations in atmospheric COS mole fractions. The change to a different soil model, on the other hand, had a relatively small effect on the global biosphere COS sink. The small role of the modeled soil component in the COS budget supports the use of COS as a global photosynthesis tracer.

Linda M. J. Kooijmans et al.

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review of bg-2021-192', Anonymous Referee #1, 11 Aug 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-192', Anonymous Referee #2, 03 Oct 2021

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Review of bg-2021-192', Anonymous Referee #1, 11 Aug 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-192', Anonymous Referee #2, 03 Oct 2021

Linda M. J. Kooijmans et al.

Data sets

SiB4 simulation output Linda Kooijmans https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5084644

Model code and software

SiB4 model code K.D. Haynes https://gitlab.com/kdhaynes/sib4_corral

Linda M. J. Kooijmans et al.

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Short summary
The gas carbonyl sulfide (COS) can be used to estimate photosynthesis. To adopt this approach on regional and global scales, we need biosphere models that can simulate COS exchange. So far, such models haven’t been evaluated against observations. We evaluate the COS biosphere exchange of the SiB4 model against COS flux observations. We find that the model is capable of simulating key processes in COS biosphere exchange. Still, we give recommendations for further improvement of the model.
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