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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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People worldwide use fire to manage agriculture, but often also suppress fire in the landscape surrounding their fields. Here, we estimate the net result of these effects of cropland and pasture on fire at a regional, monthly level. Pasture is shown, for the first time, to contribute strongly to global patterns of burning. Our results could be used to improve representations of burning in global vegetation and climate models, improving our understanding of how people affect the Earth system.
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Articles | Volume 12, issue 22
Biogeosciences, 12, 6591–6604, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6591-2015
Biogeosciences, 12, 6591–6604, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6591-2015

Research article 19 Nov 2015

Research article | 19 Nov 2015

Quantifying regional, time-varying effects of cropland and pasture on vegetation fire

S. S. Rabin et al.

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Short summary
People worldwide use fire to manage agriculture, but often also suppress fire in the landscape surrounding their fields. Here, we estimate the net result of these effects of cropland and pasture on fire at a regional, monthly level. Pasture is shown, for the first time, to contribute strongly to global patterns of burning. Our results could be used to improve representations of burning in global vegetation and climate models, improving our understanding of how people affect the Earth system.
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