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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Recent Southern Hemisphere (SH) atmospheric circulation, predominantly driven by stratospheric ozone depletion over Antarctica, has caused changes in climate across the extratropics. We present evidence that the Brazilian coast may have been impacted from both wind and sea surface temperature changes derived from this process. Skeleton analysis of massive coral species living in shallow waters off Brazil are very sensitive to air–sea interactions and seem to record this process.
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Articles | Volume 13, issue 8
Biogeosciences, 13, 2379–2386, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-2379-2016
Biogeosciences, 13, 2379–2386, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-2379-2016

Ideas and perspectives 25 Apr 2016

Ideas and perspectives | 25 Apr 2016

Ideas and perspectives: Southwestern tropical Atlantic coral growth response to atmospheric circulation changes induced by ozone depletion in Antarctica

Heitor Evangelista et al.

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Short summary
Recent Southern Hemisphere (SH) atmospheric circulation, predominantly driven by stratospheric ozone depletion over Antarctica, has caused changes in climate across the extratropics. We present evidence that the Brazilian coast may have been impacted from both wind and sea surface temperature changes derived from this process. Skeleton analysis of massive coral species living in shallow waters off Brazil are very sensitive to air–sea interactions and seem to record this process.
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