Articles | Volume 13, issue 13
Biogeosciences, 13, 3945–3970, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-3945-2016
Biogeosciences, 13, 3945–3970, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-3945-2016

Research article 08 Jul 2016

Research article | 08 Jul 2016

Water level, vegetation composition, and plant productivity explain greenhouse gas fluxes in temperate cutover fens after inundation

Merten Minke et al.

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Short summary
We studied GHG emissions along water-level gradients of two inundated cutover fens with closed chambers. N2O fluxes were negligible. CO2 and CH4 fluxes were controlled by vegetation composition and plant productivity, which in turn depended on water level and nutrient conditions. CH4 fluxes from mesotrophic sites were low and largely compensated for by CO2 uptake. Eutrophic sites were strong CH4 sources, and GHG balances depended on the plant's net C sink, which strongly differed between species.
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