Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 13
Biogeosciences, 13, 4049–4064, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4049-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 13, 4049–4064, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4049-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 15 Jul 2016

Research article | 15 Jul 2016

Contrasting radiation and soil heat fluxes in Arctic shrub and wet sedge tundra

Inge Juszak et al.

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Short summary
Changes in Arctic vegetation composition and structure feed back to climate and permafrost. Using field observations at a Siberian tundra site, we find that dwarf shrubs absorb more solar radiation than wet sedges and thus amplify surface warming, especially during snow melt. On the other hand, permafrost thaw was enhanced below sedges as a consequence of high soil moisture. Standing dead sedge leaves affected the radiation budget strongly and deserve more scientific attention.
Changes in Arctic vegetation composition and structure feed back to climate and permafrost....
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