Articles | Volume 13, issue 15
Biogeosciences, 13, 4491–4512, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4491-2016
Biogeosciences, 13, 4491–4512, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4491-2016
Research article
11 Aug 2016
Research article | 11 Aug 2016

Massive asphalt deposits, oil seepage, and gas venting support abundant chemosynthetic communities at the Campeche Knolls, southern Gulf of Mexico

Heiko Sahling et al.

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Short summary
We were excited about nature’s diversity when we discovered spectacular flows of heavy oil at the seafloor with the remotely operated vehicle QUEST 4000 m in Campeche Bay, southern Gulf of Mexico. Vigorous methane gas bubble emissions lead to massive gas hydrate deposits at water depth as deep as 3420 m. The hydrates formed metre-sized mounds at the seafloor that were densely overgrown by vestimentiferan tubeworms and other seep-typical organisms.
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