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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 14, issue 22
Biogeosciences, 14, 5217–5237, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5217-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: The Ocean in a High-CO2 World IV

Biogeosciences, 14, 5217–5237, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5217-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 21 Nov 2017

Research article | 21 Nov 2017

Carbon uptake and biogeochemical change in the Southern Ocean, south of Tasmania

Paula Conde Pardo et al.

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The carbon content of the water masses of the Southern Ocean south of Tasmania has increased over the period 1995–2011, leading to a general decrease in pH. An enhancement in the upwelling of DIC-rich deep waters is the main plausible cause of the increase in carbon in surface waters south of the Polar Front. North of the Polar Front, strong winds favor the ventilation of surface to intermediate layers, where the DIC increase is explained by the uptake of atmospheric CO2.
The carbon content of the water masses of the Southern Ocean south of Tasmania has increased...
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