Articles | Volume 15, issue 10
Biogeosciences, 15, 3085–3092, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3085-2018
Biogeosciences, 15, 3085–3092, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3085-2018
Research article
18 May 2018
Research article | 18 May 2018

Use of argon to measure gas exchange in turbulent mountain streams

Robert O. Hall Jr. and Hilary L. Madinger

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Short summary
Streams exchange oxygen with the atmosphere, but this rate is difficult to measure. We added argon to small mountain streams to estimate gas exchange. We compared these rates with sulfur hexafluoride, an intense greenhouse gas. Argon worked well to measure gas exchange, but had higher-than-predicted rates than sulfur hexafluoride. Argon exchange is more likely to represent that for oxygen because they share similar physical properties. We suggest argon to measure gas exchange in small streams.
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