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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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BG | Articles | Volume 15, issue 11
Biogeosciences, 15, 3277–3291, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3277-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 15, 3277–3291, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3277-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 04 Jun 2018

Research article | 04 Jun 2018

Stomatal control of leaf fluxes of carbonyl sulfide and CO2 in a Typha freshwater marsh

Wu Sun et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (14 Mar 2018) by Paul Stoy
AR by Wu Sun on behalf of the Authors (20 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (21 Mar 2018) by Paul Stoy
RR by Teresa Gimeno (26 Mar 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (26 Apr 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (27 Apr 2018) by Paul Stoy
AR by Wu Sun on behalf of the Authors (15 May 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (19 May 2018) by Paul Stoy
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Short summary
Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an emerging tracer to probe land photosynthesis at canopy to global scales, but the relationship between leaf COS and CO2 fluxes needed for this application is poorly quantified. With in situ leaf fluxes of COS and CO2 measured in a freshwater marsh, we show that light and vapor deficit control the relationship between leaf COS and CO2 fluxes by regulating stomatal conductance. Our findings support the use of COS as a tracer for canopy photosynthesis.
Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an emerging tracer to probe land photosynthesis at canopy to global...
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