Articles | Volume 15, issue 13
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3937-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3937-2018
Research article
 | 
02 Jul 2018
Research article |  | 02 Jul 2018

Response of hydrology and CO2 flux to experimentally altered rainfall frequency in a temperate poor fen, southern Ontario, Canada

Danielle D. Radu and Tim P. Duval

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Latest update: 27 May 2024
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Short summary
Climate change can shift rainfall into fewer, more intense events with longer dry periods, leading to changes in peatland hydrology and carbon cycling. We manipulated rain events over three peatland plant types (moss, sedge, and shrub). We found increasing regime intensity led to drier surface soils and deeper water tables, reducing plant carbon uptake. Mosses became sources of CO2 after >3 consecutive dry days. This study shows peatlands may become smaller sinks for carbon due to rain changes.
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