Articles | Volume 15, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-703-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-703-2018
Research article
 | 
05 Feb 2018
Research article |  | 05 Feb 2018

Peat decomposability in managed organic soils in relation to land use, organic matter composition and temperature

Cédric Bader, Moritz Müller, Rainer Schulin, and Jens Leifeld

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Latest update: 22 May 2024
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Short summary
When drained, peatlands degrade and release large quantities of CO2, thereby contributing to global warming. Do land use or the chemical composition of peat control the rate of that release? We studied 21 sites from the temperate climate zone managed as croplands, grasslands, or forests and found that the CO2 release was high, but only slightly influenced by land use or peat composition. Hence, only keeping peatlands in their natural state prevents them from becoming strong CO2 sources.
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