Articles | Volume 16, issue 2
Biogeosciences, 16, 643–661, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-643-2019
Biogeosciences, 16, 643–661, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-643-2019
Research article
01 Feb 2019
Research article | 01 Feb 2019

Oxygen isotope composition of the final chamber of planktic foraminifera provides evidence of vertical migration and depth-integrated growth

Hilde Pracht et al.

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Short summary
In palaeoceanography the shells of single-celled foraminifera are routinely used as proxies to reconstruct the temperature, salinity and circulation of the ocean in the past. Traditionally a number of specimens were pooled for a single stable isotope measurement; however, technical advances now mean that a single shell or chamber of a shell can be measured individually. Three different hypotheses regarding foraminiferal biology and ecology were tested using this approach.
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