Articles | Volume 16, issue 4
Biogeosciences, 16, 863–879, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-863-2019
Biogeosciences, 16, 863–879, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-863-2019

Research article 20 Feb 2019

Research article | 20 Feb 2019

Remineralization rate of terrestrial DOC as inferred from CO2 supersaturated coastal waters

Filippa Fransner et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (22 Nov 2018) by Stefano Ciavatta
AR by Filippa Fransner on behalf of the Authors (13 Dec 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (17 Dec 2018) by Stefano Ciavatta
AR by Filippa Fransner on behalf of the Authors (07 Jan 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Jan 2019) by Stefano Ciavatta
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (08 Jan 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (11 Jan 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (14 Jan 2019) by Stefano Ciavatta
AR by Filippa Fransner on behalf of the Authors (28 Jan 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (29 Jan 2019) by Stefano Ciavatta
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Short summary
Although rivers carry large amounts of organic material to the oceans, little is known about what fate it meets when it reaches the sea. In this study we are investigating the fate of the carbon in this organic matter by the use of a numerical model in combination with ship measurements from the northern Baltic Sea. Our results suggests that there is substantial remineralization taking place, transforming the organic carbon into CO2, which is released to the atmosphere.
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