Articles | Volume 17, issue 8
Biogeosciences, 17, 2181–2204, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-2181-2020
Biogeosciences, 17, 2181–2204, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-2181-2020
Reviews and syntheses
21 Apr 2020
Reviews and syntheses | 21 Apr 2020

Dimethylsulfide (DMS), marine biogenic aerosols and the ecophysiology of coral reefs

Rebecca L. Jackson et al.

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Short summary
Coral reefs are a strong source of atmospheric sulfur through stress-induced emissions of dimethylsulfide (DMS). This biogenic sulfur can influence aerosol and cloud properties and, consequently, the radiative balance over the ocean. DMS emissions may therefore help to mitigate coral physiological stress via increased low-level cloud cover and reduced sea surface temperature. The importance of DMS in coral physiology and climate is reviewed and the implications for coral bleaching are discussed.
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