Articles | Volume 17, issue 12
Biogeosciences, 17, 3083–3097, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3083-2020
Biogeosciences, 17, 3083–3097, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-3083-2020

Research article 18 Jun 2020

Research article | 18 Jun 2020

A revised pan-Arctic permafrost soil Hg pool based on Western Siberian peat Hg and carbon observations

Artem G. Lim et al.

Data sets

Permafrost stores a globally significant amount of mercury (Supplement) P. F. Schuster, K. M. Schaefer, G. R. Aiken, R. C. Antweiler, J. F. Dewild, J. D. Gryziec, A. Gusmeroli, G. Hugelius, E. Jafarov, D. P. Krabbenhoft, L. Liu, N. Herman-Mercer, C. Mu, D. A. Roth, T. Schaefer, R. G. Striegl, K. P. Wickland, and T. Zhang https://doi.org/10.1002/2017GL075571

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Short summary
To better understand the mercury (Hg) content in northern soils, we measured Hg concentration in peat cores across a 1700 km permafrost gradient in Siberia. We demonstrated a northward increase in Hg concentration in peat and Hg pools in frozen peatlands. We revised the 0–30 cm northern soil Hg pool to be 72 Gg, which is 7 % of the global soil Hg pool of 1086 Gg. The results are important for understanding Hg exchange between soil, water, and the atmosphere under climate change in the Arctic.
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