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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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BG | Articles | Volume 17, issue 15
Biogeosciences, 17, 4025–4042, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4025-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 17, 4025–4042, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4025-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 10 Aug 2020

Research article | 10 Aug 2020

Environmental controls on ecosystem-scale cold-season methane and carbon dioxide fluxes in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

Dean Howard et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (14 May 2020) by David Bowling
AR by Dean Howard on behalf of the Authors (14 May 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (14 May 2020) by David Bowling
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (19 May 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Jun 2020) by David Bowling
AR by Dean Howard on behalf of the Authors (28 Jun 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (02 Jul 2020) by David Bowling
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Short summary
The Arctic tundra represents a vast store of carbon that may be broken down by microbial activity into greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. Though microbes are less active in winter, the long duration of the cold season makes this period very important for carbon cycling. We show that, under conditions of warmer winter air temperatures and greater snowfall, deeper soils can remain warm enough to sustain significantly enhanced CH4 emission. This could have large implications for future climates.
The Arctic tundra represents a vast store of carbon that may be broken down by microbial...
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