Articles | Volume 17, issue 22
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-5599-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-5599-2020
Research article
 | 
18 Nov 2020
Research article |  | 18 Nov 2020

Stable isotopes track the ecological and biogeochemical legacy of mass mangrove forest dieback in the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia

Yota Harada, Rod M. Connolly, Brian Fry, Damien T. Maher, James Z. Sippo, Luke C. Jeffrey, Adam J. Bourke, and Shing Yip Lee

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Short summary
In 2015–2016, an extensive area of mangroves along ~ 1000  km of coastline in the Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia, experienced dieback as a result of a climatic extreme event that included drought conditions and low sea levels. Multiannual field campaigns conducted from 2016 to 2018 show substantial recovery of the mangrove vegetation. However, stable isotopes suggest long-lasting changes in carbon, nitrogen and sulfur cycling following the dieback.
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