Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2015-637
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2015-637

  18 Jan 2016

18 Jan 2016

Review status: this preprint was under review for the journal BG but the revision was not accepted.

Community change of microorganisms in the Muztagata and Dunde glacier and climatic and environmental implications

Yong Chen1, Xiang-Kai Li1, Jing Si2, Guang-Jian WU3, Li-De Tian3, and Shu-Rong Xiang1,3 Yong Chen et al.
  • 1School of Life Science, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000, China
  • 2Instituten of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000, China
  • 3Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China

Abstract. Microorganisms are continuously blown onto the glacier snow, and thus the glacial depth profiles provide excellent geographic archives of the microbial communities. However, it is uncertain about how the microbial communities respond to the climatic and environmental changes over the glacier ice. In the present study, the live microbial density, stable isotopic ratios, 18O/16O in the precipitation, and mineral particle concentrations along the glacial depth profiles were collected from ice cores from the Muztagata glacier and the Dunde ice cap. Six bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were established from the Dunde ice core. The Muztagata ice core presented seasonal response patterns for both live and total cell density with high cell density occurring in the warming spring and summer. Both ice core data showed a frequent association of dust and microorganisms in the ice. Genera Polaromas sp., Pedobacter sp, Flavobacterium sp., Cryobacteriium sp., and Propionibacterium/Blastococcus sp. frequently appeared at the six tested ice layers, and constituted the dominant species endemic to the Dunde ice cap, whereas some genera such as Rhodoferax sp., Variovorax sp., Sphingobacterium sp., Cyanobacterium sp., Knoellia sp., and Luteolibacter sp. rarely presented in the ice. In conclusion, data present a discrete increase of microbial cell density in the warming seasons and biogeography of the microbial communities associated with the predominance of a few endemic groups in the local glacial regions. This reinforces our hypothesis of dust-borne and post-deposition being the main agents interactively controlling microbial load in the glacier ice.

Yong Chen et al.

 
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Status: closed
Status: closed
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Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Yong Chen et al.

Yong Chen et al.

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