Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2016-42
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2016-42

  12 Feb 2016

12 Feb 2016

Review status: this discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.

The silica-carbon biogeochemical cycle in the Bohai Sea and its responses to the changing terrestrial loadings

Jun Liu1,2, Lex Bouwman3,4, Jiaye Zang1, Chenying Zhao1, Xiaochen Liu3, and Xiangbin Ran1,3 Jun Liu et al.
  • 1Research Center for Marine Ecology, First Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Qingdao 266061, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, China
  • 3Department of Earth Sciences–Geochemistry, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, 3508 TA, the Netherlands
  • 4PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Bilthoven, 3720 AH, the Netherlands

Abstract. Silicon (Si) and carbon (C) play key roles in the river and marine biogeochemistry. The Si and C budgets for the Bohai Sea were established on the basis of measurements at a range of stations and additional data from the literature. The results show that the spatial distributions of reactive Si and organic C (OC) in the water column are largely affected by the riverine input, primary production and export to the Yellow Sea. Biogenic silica (BSi) and total OC in sediments are mainly from marine primary production. The major supply of dissolved silicate (DSi) comes from benthic diffusion, riverine input alone accounts for 17 % of reactive Si inputs to the Bohai Sea; the dominant DSi removal from the water column is diatom uptake, followed by sedimentation. Rivers contribute 47 % of exogenous OC inputs to the Bohai Sea; the dominant outputs of OC are sedimentation and export to the Yellow Sea. The net burial of BSi and OC represent 3.3 % and 1.0 % of total primary production, respectively. Primary production has increased by 10 % since 2002 as a result of increased river loads of DSi and BSi. Our findings underline the critical role of riverine Si supply in primary production in coastal marine ecosystems.

Jun Liu et al.

 
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Status: closed
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Jun Liu et al.

Jun Liu et al.

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