Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-491
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2017-491
30 Nov 2017
 | 30 Nov 2017
Status: this preprint was under review for the journal BG. A revision for further review has not been submitted.

Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to terrestrial ecosystems across Germany

Martijn Schaap, Sabine Banzhaf, Thomas Scheuschner, Markus Geupel, Carlijn Hendriks, Richard Kranenburg, Hans-Dieter Nagel, Arjo J. Segers, Angela von Schlutow, Roy Wichink Kruit, and Peter J. H. Builtjes

Abstract. Biodiversity is strongly affected by the deposition of nitrogen and sulfur on terrestrial ecosystems. In this paper we present new quantitative estimates of the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen to ecosystems across Germany. The methodology combines prognostic and empirical modelling to establish wet deposition fluxes and land use dependent dry and occult deposition fluxes. On average, the nitrogen deposition in Germany was estimated to be 1057 eq ha−1 yr−1. The deposition maps show considerable variability across the German territory with highest deposition on forest ecosystems in or near the main agricultural and industrial areas. The accumulated deposition over Germany of this study is systematically lower (27 %) than provided in earlier studies. The main reasons are an improved wet deposition estimation and the consolidation of improved process descriptions in the LOTOS-EUROS chemistry transport model. The presented deposition estimates show a better agreement with results obtained by integrated monitoring and deposition modelling by EMEP than the earlier results. Through comparison of the new deposition distributions with critical load maps it is estimated that 70 % of the ecosystems in Germany receive too much nitrogen.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Martijn Schaap, Sabine Banzhaf, Thomas Scheuschner, Markus Geupel, Carlijn Hendriks, Richard Kranenburg, Hans-Dieter Nagel, Arjo J. Segers, Angela von Schlutow, Roy Wichink Kruit, and Peter J. H. Builtjes
 
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Martijn Schaap, Sabine Banzhaf, Thomas Scheuschner, Markus Geupel, Carlijn Hendriks, Richard Kranenburg, Hans-Dieter Nagel, Arjo J. Segers, Angela von Schlutow, Roy Wichink Kruit, and Peter J. H. Builtjes
Martijn Schaap, Sabine Banzhaf, Thomas Scheuschner, Markus Geupel, Carlijn Hendriks, Richard Kranenburg, Hans-Dieter Nagel, Arjo J. Segers, Angela von Schlutow, Roy Wichink Kruit, and Peter J. H. Builtjes

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Latest update: 26 May 2024
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Short summary
Deposition of nitrogen and sulfur from the atmosphere on ecosystems causes a loss of biodiversity. We used a combination of atmospheric modelling and deposition observations to estimate the deposition to ecosystems across Germany. We estimate that 70 % of the ecosystems in Germany receive too much nitrogen from deposition. The results are used to determine whether economic activities causing nitrogen emissions are allowed in sensitive areas.
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