Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-442
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2020-442

  04 Dec 2020

04 Dec 2020

Review status: this preprint was under review for the journal BG but the revision was not accepted.

Air–sea carbon flux from high-temporal-resolution data of in situ CO2 measurements in the southern North Sea

Steven Pint, Gert Everaert, Hannelore Theetaert, Michiel B. Vandegehuchte, and Thanos Gkritzalis Steven Pint et al.
  • Flanders Marine Institute, Wandelaarkaai 7, B-8400, Ostend, Belgium

Abstract. An important element to keep track of global change is the atmosphere–water exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ocean as it provides insight in how much CO2 is incorporated in the ocean (i.e. the ocean as a sink for CO2) or emitted to the atmosphere (i.e. the ocean as a source). To date, only few high-resolution observation sets are available to quantify the spatiotemporal variability of air–sea CO2 fluxes. In this study, we used observations of pCO2 collected daily at the ICOS station Thornton Buoy in the southern North Sea from February until December 2018 to calculate air–sea CO2 fluxes. Our results show a seasonal variability of the air–sea carbon flux, with the sea being a carbon sink from February until June switching to a carbon source in July and August, before switching back to a sink until December. We calculated that the sink was largest in April (−0.95 ± 0.90 mmol C m−2 d−1), while in August, the source was at its maximum (0.08 ± 0.13 mmol C m−2 d−1). On an annual basis, we found a sink for atmospheric CO2 of 130.19 ± 149.93 mmol C m−2 y−1. Apart from region- and basin-scale estimates of the air–sea CO2 flux, also local measurements are important to grasp local dynamics of the flux and its interactions with biogeochemical processes.

Steven Pint et al.

 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Steven Pint et al.

Steven Pint et al.

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Short summary
We calculated the air–sea CO2 flux in the southern North Sea for 2018 using high frequency data from the ICOS Station BE-FOS-Thornton Buoy. The area acted as a CO2 sink for this year but we also identified a seasonal variability of the CO2 flux during this period, both in terms of amplitude but also direction (source–sink). The data set and our analysis showcase the importance of high quality and high frequency data in order to constrain the air–sea CO2 flux in coastal dynamic environments.
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