Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-303
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2021-303
 
08 Dec 2021
08 Dec 2021
Status: this discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Biogeosciences (BG). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.

Effects of tropical rainforest conversion to rubber plantation on soil quality in Hainan Island, China

Rui Sun1,2, Guoyu Lan1,2, Chuan Yang1,2, Zhixiang Wu1,2, Banqian Chen1,2, and Klaus Fraedrich3 Rui Sun et al.
  • 1Rubber Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Haikou 571101, China
  • 2Hainan Danzhou Agro-ecosystem National Observation and Research Station, Danzhou 571737, China
  • 3Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg 20146, Germany

Abstract. Land-use changes can alter soil properties and thus affect soil quality. Our understanding of how forest conversion (from tropical rainforest to rubber plantations) affects soil properties and soil quality is limited. An ideal testing ground for analyzing such land-use change and its impacts is Hainan Island, the largest tropical island in China. Based on 21 soil physicochemical and biological properties, a soil quality index (SQI) employed principal component analysis to assess soil quality changes from the conversion of tropical rainforests to rubber plantations. The results showed that (i) soil available potassium, available phosphorus, microbial biomass carbon, cellulose decomposition, acid phosphatase, and urease were vital soil properties for soil quality assessment on Hainan Island. (ii) The SQI of rubber plantations decreased by 26.48 % compared to tropical rainforests, while four investigated soil properties (soil pH, total phosphorus, cellulose decomposition, and actinomyces) increased. (iii) The SQI of both the tropical rainforests and rubber plantations showed significant spatial differences, which, under tropical rainforests, was more sensitive to seasonal changes than those under rubber plantations. (iv) Structural equation modeling suggested that forest conversion directly impacted soil quality and, indirectly impacted soil qualities' spatial variation by their interaction with soil types and geographical positions. Overall, though the conversion of tropical rainforest to rubber plantation did not decrease all soil properties, the tropical rainforest with its high soil quality should be protected.

Rui Sun et al.

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-303', Anonymous Referee #1, 23 Dec 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Rui Sun, 05 Jan 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-303', Anonymous Referee #2, 24 Mar 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Rui Sun, 30 Mar 2022

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on bg-2021-303', Anonymous Referee #1, 23 Dec 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Rui Sun, 05 Jan 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on bg-2021-303', Anonymous Referee #2, 24 Mar 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Rui Sun, 30 Mar 2022

Rui Sun et al.

Rui Sun et al.

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Short summary
A soil quality index (SQI) based on 21 soil properties was employed to assess soil quality changes from tropical rainforest (TR) to rubber plantations (RP) . The results showed that the SQI of RP decreased by 26.48 % compared to TR, while four investigated soil properties increased. The SQI of both the TR and RP showed significant spatial differences, which, under TR, was more sensitive to seasonal changes than those under RP.
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