Articles | Volume 11, issue 22
Biogeosciences, 11, 6251–6262, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-11-6251-2014
Biogeosciences, 11, 6251–6262, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-11-6251-2014

Research article 17 Nov 2014

Research article | 17 Nov 2014

A downward CO2 flux seems to have nowhere to go

J. Ma et al.

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Short summary
We have discovered and verified a new CO2 sink in one of the most unlikely places on earth-a saline desert located in a desert-oasis ecotone. The observed downward CO2 flux was not found in either plants or soil, but in groundwater. Fluctuation of the groundwater table moves the dissolved inorganic carbon in soil, which originated from soil/root respiration, downward into the groundwater body and forms a carbon sink hidden under the desert.
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