Articles | Volume 14, issue 15
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-3743-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-3743-2017
Research article
 | 
15 Aug 2017
Research article |  | 15 Aug 2017

A global hotspot for dissolved organic carbon in hypermaritime watersheds of coastal British Columbia

Allison A. Oliver, Suzanne E. Tank, Ian Giesbrecht, Maartje C. Korver, William C. Floyd, Paul Sanborn, Chuck Bulmer, and Ken P. Lertzman

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Short summary
Rivers draining small watersheds of the outer coastal Pacific temperate rainforest export some of the highest yields of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the world directly to the ocean. This DOC is largely derived from soils and terrestrial plants. Rainfall, temperature, and watershed characteristics such as wetlands and lakes are important controls on DOC export. This region may be significant for carbon export and linking terrestrial carbon to marine ecosystems.
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