Articles | Volume 14, issue 22
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5143-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5143-2017
Research article
 | 
17 Nov 2017
Research article |  | 17 Nov 2017

Carbon stocks and fluxes in the high latitudes: using site-level data to evaluate Earth system models

Sarah E. Chadburn, Gerhard Krinner, Philipp Porada, Annett Bartsch, Christian Beer, Luca Belelli Marchesini, Julia Boike, Altug Ekici, Bo Elberling, Thomas Friborg, Gustaf Hugelius, Margareta Johansson, Peter Kuhry, Lars Kutzbach, Moritz Langer, Magnus Lund, Frans-Jan W. Parmentier, Shushi Peng, Ko Van Huissteden, Tao Wang, Sebastian Westermann, Dan Zhu, and Eleanor J. Burke

Viewed

Total article views: 5,447 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
3,365 1,892 190 5,447 411 99 146
  • HTML: 3,365
  • PDF: 1,892
  • XML: 190
  • Total: 5,447
  • Supplement: 411
  • BibTeX: 99
  • EndNote: 146
Views and downloads (calculated since 31 May 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 31 May 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 5,447 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 5,219 with geography defined and 228 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 17 Jun 2024
Download
Short summary
Earth system models (ESMs) are our main tools for understanding future climate. The Arctic is important for the future carbon cycle, particularly due to the large carbon stocks in permafrost. We evaluated the performance of the land component of three major ESMs at Arctic tundra sites, focusing on the fluxes and stocks of carbon. We show that the next steps for model improvement are to better represent vegetation dynamics, to include mosses and to improve below-ground carbon cycle processes.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint