Articles | Volume 15, issue 13
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-4131-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-4131-2018
Research article
 | 
06 Jul 2018
Research article |  | 06 Jul 2018

Abyssal plain faunal carbon flows remain depressed 26 years after a simulated deep-sea mining disturbance

Tanja Stratmann, Lidia Lins, Autun Purser, Yann Marcon, Clara F. Rodrigues, Ascensão Ravara, Marina R. Cunha, Erik Simon-Lledó, Daniel O. B. Jones, Andrew K. Sweetman, Kevin Köser, and Dick van Oevelen

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Latest update: 12 Jul 2024
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Short summary
Extraction of polymetallic nodules will have negative impacts on the deep-sea ecosystem, but it is not known whether the ecosystem is able to recover from them. Therefore, in 1989 a sediment disturbance experiment was conducted in the Peru Basin to mimic deep-sea mining. Subsequently, the experimental site was re-visited 5 times to monitor the recovery of fauna. We developed food-web models for all 5 time steps and found that, even after 26 years, carbon flow in the system differs significantly.
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