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Volume 15, issue 16
Biogeosciences, 15, 5061–5091, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-5061-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 15, 5061–5091, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-5061-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 27 Aug 2018

Research article | 27 Aug 2018

Mesoscale contribution to the long-range offshore transport of organic carbon from the Canary Upwelling System to the open North Atlantic

Elisa Lovecchio et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Jul 2018) by Gerhard Herndl
AR by Elisa Lovecchio on behalf of the Authors (24 Jul 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (12 Aug 2018) by Gerhard Herndl
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
We find that the ocean's flow on scales of a few tens to a few hundred km has a central role in the lateral redistribution of the organic carbon from the coast to the open ocean. Narrow coastal filaments drive the offshore flux of organic carbon and strongly enhance its availability up to 1000 km from the coast. Eddies extend the flux up to 2000 km offshore containing 30 % of the organic matter in the open waters. Resolving these scales is essential to capture the coastal/open ocean coupling.
We find that the ocean's flow on scales of a few tens to a few hundred km has a central role in...
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