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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Computer simulations of the highly variable phytoplankton in the Ross Sea demonstrated how incorporating data from different sources (satellite, ship, or glider) results in different system interpretations. For example, simulations assimilating satellite-based data produced lower carbon export estimates. Combining observations with models in this remote, harsh, and biologically variable environment should include consideration of the potential impacts of data frequency, duration, and coverage.
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Articles | Volume 15, issue 1
Biogeosciences, 15, 73–90, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-73-2018
Biogeosciences, 15, 73–90, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-73-2018

Research article 04 Jan 2018

Research article | 04 Jan 2018

Assimilating bio-optical glider data during a phytoplankton bloom in the southern Ross Sea

Daniel E. Kaufman et al.

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Latest update: 19 Jan 2021
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Computer simulations of the highly variable phytoplankton in the Ross Sea demonstrated how incorporating data from different sources (satellite, ship, or glider) results in different system interpretations. For example, simulations assimilating satellite-based data produced lower carbon export estimates. Combining observations with models in this remote, harsh, and biologically variable environment should include consideration of the potential impacts of data frequency, duration, and coverage.
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Final-revised paper
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