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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in streams can pose a threat to downstream water resources. Analyzing data from an in-stream probe we found that hydroclimatic and hydrological drivers can describe up to 72 % of the observed DOC concentration and composition variability. Variability was found to be highest during discharge events with warm and dry preconditions. The findings suggest an impact of climate change on DOC exports and thus also on downstream water quality.
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BG | Articles | Volume 16, issue 22
Biogeosciences, 16, 4497–4516, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-4497-2019
Biogeosciences, 16, 4497–4516, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-4497-2019

Research article 28 Nov 2019

Research article | 28 Nov 2019

High-frequency measurements explain quantity and quality of dissolved organic carbon mobilization in a headwater catchment

Benedikt J. Werner et al.

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Short summary
Increased dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in streams can pose a threat to downstream water resources. Analyzing data from an in-stream probe we found that hydroclimatic and hydrological drivers can describe up to 72 % of the observed DOC concentration and composition variability. Variability was found to be highest during discharge events with warm and dry preconditions. The findings suggest an impact of climate change on DOC exports and thus also on downstream water quality.
Citation
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Final-revised paper
Preprint