Articles | Volume 16, issue 4
Biogeosciences, 16, 903–916, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-903-2019
Biogeosciences, 16, 903–916, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-903-2019

Research article 26 Feb 2019

Research article | 26 Feb 2019

Examining the evidence for decoupling between photosynthesis and transpiration during heat extremes

Martin G. De Kauwe et al.

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Short summary
Recent experimental evidence suggests that during heat extremes, trees may reduce photosynthesis to near zero but increase transpiration. Using eddy covariance data and examining the 3 days leading up to a temperature extreme, we found evidence of reduced photosynthesis and sustained or increased latent heat fluxes at Australian wooded flux sites. However, when focusing on heatwaves, we were unable to disentangle photosynthetic decoupling from the effect of increasing vapour pressure deficit.
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