Articles | Volume 16, issue 4
Biogeosciences, 16, 927–947, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-927-2019
Biogeosciences, 16, 927–947, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-927-2019

Research article 27 Feb 2019

Research article | 27 Feb 2019

Composition and vertical flux of particulate organic matter to the oxygen minimum zone of the central Baltic Sea: impact of a sporadic North Sea inflow

Carolina Cisternas-Novoa et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (13 Nov 2018) by Marcel van der Meer
AR by Carolina Cisternas- Novoa on behalf of the Authors (15 Nov 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (30 Nov 2018) by Marcel van der Meer
AR by Carolina Cisternas- Novoa on behalf of the Authors (21 Jan 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (06 Feb 2019) by Marcel van der Meer
AR by Carolina Cisternas- Novoa on behalf of the Authors (11 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We investigate the composition and vertical fluxes of POM in two deep basins of the Baltic Sea (GB: Gotland Basin and LD: Landsort Deep). The two basins showed different O2 regimes resulting from the intrusion of oxygen-rich water from the North Sea that ventilated the deep waters in GB, but not in LD. In GB, O2 intrusions lead to a high abundance of manganese oxides that aggregate with POM, altering its composition and vertical flux and contributing to a higher POC transfer efficiency in GB.
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