Articles | Volume 17, issue 7
Biogeosciences, 17, 1717–1730, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-1717-2020
Biogeosciences, 17, 1717–1730, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-1717-2020

Research article 03 Apr 2020

Research article | 03 Apr 2020

Warming enhances carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from Red Sea seagrass (Halophila stipulacea) sediments

Celina Burkholz et al.

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Latest update: 25 Jan 2022
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Short summary
Seagrass meadows store carbon in their biomass and sediments, but they have also been shown to be sources of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). We experimentally investigated the effect of warming and prolonged darkness on CO2 and CH4 fluxes in Red Sea seagrass (Halophila stipulacea) communities. Our results indicated that sublethal warming may lead to increased emissions of greenhouse gases from seagrass meadows which may contribute to further enhance global warming.
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