Articles | Volume 17, issue 9
Biogeosciences, 17, 2657–2680, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-2657-2020

Special issue: Assessing environmental impacts of deep-sea mining...

Biogeosciences, 17, 2657–2680, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-2657-2020

Research article 15 May 2020

Research article | 15 May 2020

Are seamounts refuge areas for fauna from polymetallic nodule fields?

Daphne Cuvelier et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (05 Dec 2019) by Matthias Haeckel
AR by Daphne Cuvelier on behalf of the Authors (09 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (31 Jan 2020) by Matthias Haeckel
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (14 Feb 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Feb 2020) by Matthias Haeckel
AR by Daphne Cuvelier on behalf of the Authors (09 Mar 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (20 Mar 2020) by Matthias Haeckel
ED: Publish as is (23 Mar 2020) by Jack Middelburg(Co-Editor-in-Chief)
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Short summary
Polymetallic nodule mining will remove hard substrata from the abyssal deep-sea floor. The only neighbouring ecosystems featuring hard substratum are seamounts, and their inhabiting fauna could aid in recovery post-mining. Nevertheless, first observations of seamount megafauna were very different from nodule-associated megafauna and showed little overlap. The possible uniqueness of these ecosystems implies that they should be included in management plans for the conservation of biodiversity.
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