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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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BG | Articles | Volume 17, issue 15
Biogeosciences, 17, 4103–4117, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4103-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 17, 4103–4117, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4103-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 13 Aug 2020

Research article | 13 Aug 2020

Soils from cold and snowy temperate deciduous forests release more nitrogen and phosphorus after soil freeze–thaw cycles than soils from warmer, snow-poor conditions

Juergen Kreyling et al.

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Status: closed
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (10 Jun 2020) by Frank Hagedorn
AR by Jürgen Kreyling on behalf of the Authors (11 Jun 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Jun 2020) by Frank Hagedorn
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (29 Jun 2020)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (06 Jul 2020) by Frank Hagedorn
AR by Jürgen Kreyling on behalf of the Authors (06 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Temperate forest soils (sites dominated by European beech, Fagus sylvatica) from cold and snowy sites in northern Poland release more nitrogen and phosphorus after soil freeze–thaw cycles (FTCs) than soils from warmer, snow-poor conditions in northern Germany. Our data suggest that previously cold sites, which will lose their protective snow cover during climate change, are most vulnerable to increasing FTC frequency and magnitude, resulting in strong shifts in nitrogen leaching.
Temperate forest soils (sites dominated by European beech, Fagus sylvatica) from cold and snowy...
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