Articles | Volume 17, issue 16
Biogeosciences, 17, 4261–4279, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4261-2020
Biogeosciences, 17, 4261–4279, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4261-2020

Research article 26 Aug 2020

Research article | 26 Aug 2020

Linking tundra vegetation, snow, soil temperature, and permafrost

Inge Grünberg et al.

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Latest update: 20 Sep 2021
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Short summary
Based on topsoil temperature data for different vegetation types at a low Arctic tundra site, we found large small-scale variability. Winter temperatures were strongly influenced by vegetation through its effects on snow. Summer temperatures were similar below most vegetation types and not consistently related to late summer permafrost thaw depth. Given that vegetation type defines the relationship between winter and summer soil temperature and thaw depth, it controls permafrost vulnerability.
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