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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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BG | Articles | Volume 17, issue 17
Biogeosciences, 17, 4405–4420, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4405-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 17, 4405–4420, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4405-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 02 Sep 2020

Research article | 02 Sep 2020

Warming increases soil respiration in a carbon-rich soil without changing microbial respiratory potential

Marion Nyberg and Mark J. Hovenden

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (28 Jul 2020) by Jens-Arne Subke
AR by Marion Nyberg on behalf of the Authors (28 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (30 Jul 2020) by Jens-Arne Subke
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Short summary
Experimental warming increased soil respiration (RS) by more than 25 % in a Tasmanian C-rich soil, but there was no impact on microbial respiration in laboratory experiments. Plant community composition had no effect on RS, suggesting the response is likely due to enhanced belowground plant respiration and C supply through rhizodeposition and root exudates. Results imply we need studies of both C inputs and losses to model net ecosystem C exchange of these crucial, C-dense systems effectively.
Experimental warming increased soil respiration (RS) by more than 25 % in a Tasmanian C-rich...
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