Articles | Volume 17, issue 17
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4405-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4405-2020
Research article
 | 
02 Sep 2020
Research article |  | 02 Sep 2020

Warming increases soil respiration in a carbon-rich soil without changing microbial respiratory potential

Marion Nyberg and Mark J. Hovenden

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Latest update: 26 Feb 2024
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Short summary
Experimental warming increased soil respiration (RS) by more than 25 % in a Tasmanian C-rich soil, but there was no impact on microbial respiration in laboratory experiments. Plant community composition had no effect on RS, suggesting the response is likely due to enhanced belowground plant respiration and C supply through rhizodeposition and root exudates. Results imply we need studies of both C inputs and losses to model net ecosystem C exchange of these crucial, C-dense systems effectively.
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