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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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BG | Articles | Volume 17, issue 18
Biogeosciences, 17, 4707–4726, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4707-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 17, 4707–4726, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-17-4707-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 28 Sep 2020

Research article | 28 Sep 2020

Reconstructing extreme climatic and geochemical conditions during the largest natural mangrove dieback on record

James Z. Sippo et al.

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Latest update: 04 Dec 2020
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In 2015–2016, a massive mangrove dieback event occurred along ~1000 km of coastline in Australia. Multiple lines of evidence from climate data, wood and sediment samples suggest low water availability within the dead mangrove forest. Wood and sediments also reveal a large increase in iron concentrations in mangrove sediments during the dieback. This study supports the hypothesis that the forest dieback was associated with low water availability driven by a climate-change-related ENSO event.
In 2015–2016, a massive mangrove dieback event occurred along ~1000 km of coastline in ...
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