Articles | Volume 18, issue 5
Biogeosciences, 18, 1719–1747, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1719-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 1719–1747, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-1719-2021
Research article
11 Mar 2021
Research article | 11 Mar 2021

Modeling silicate–nitrate–ammonium co-limitation of algal growth and the importance of bacterial remineralization based on an experimental Arctic coastal spring bloom culture study

Tobias R. Vonnahme et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 1,439 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
971 418 50 1,439 83 17 19
  • HTML: 971
  • PDF: 418
  • XML: 50
  • Total: 1,439
  • Supplement: 83
  • BibTeX: 17
  • EndNote: 19
Views and downloads (calculated since 04 Sep 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 04 Sep 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 1,246 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,246 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 28 Jun 2022
Download
Short summary
Diatoms are crucial for Arctic coastal spring blooms, and their growth is controlled by nutrients and light. At the end of the bloom, inorganic nitrogen or silicon can be limiting, but nitrogen can be regenerated by bacteria, extending the algal growth phase. Modeling these multi-nutrient dynamics and the role of bacteria is challenging yet crucial for accurate modeling. We recreated spring bloom dynamics in a cultivation experiment and developed a representative dynamic model.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint