Articles | Volume 18, issue 14
Biogeosciences, 18, 4445–4472, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4445-2021
Biogeosciences, 18, 4445–4472, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-18-4445-2021
Research article
 | Highlight paper
29 Jul 2021
Research article  | Highlight paper | 29 Jul 2021

Drought effects on leaf fall, leaf flushing and stem growth in the Amazon forest: reconciling remote sensing data and field observations

Thomas Janssen et al.

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Short summary
Satellite images show that the Amazon forest has greened up during past droughts. Measurements of tree stem growth and leaf litterfall upscaled using machine-learning algorithms show that leaf flushing at the onset of a drought results in canopy rejuvenation and green-up during drought while simultaneously trees excessively shed older leaves and tree stem growth declines. Canopy green-up during drought therefore does not necessarily point to enhanced tree growth and improved forest health.
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